What is HERS rating?

The HERS Index is a measurement of a home’s energy efficiency. It will also provide you with invaluable information about the existing home you live in, like how efficiently it’s operating and where you can make modifications for greater energy savings. When you’re selling your home, a low HERS Index Score can command a higher resale price. And when you’re buying a home, you can anticipate the costs of energy bills and efficiency upgrades. A certified RESNET Home Energy Rater assesses the energy efficiency of a home, assigning it a relative performance score (the HERS Index Score). The lower the number, the more energy efficient the home. The U.S. Department of Energy has determined that a typical resale home scores 130 on the HERS Index while a home built to the 2004 International Energy Conservation Code is awarded a rating of 100.

  • A home with a HERS Index Score of 70 is 30% more energy efficient than the RESNET Reference Home.
  • A home with a HERS Index Score of 130 is 30% less energy efficient than the RESNET Reference Home.

 

Can I calculate my own home’s carbon footprint?

We produce greenhouse gas emissions from burning gasoline when we drive, burning oil or gas for home heating, or using electricity generated from coal, natural gas, and oil. Greenhouse gas emissions vary among individuals depending on a person’s location, habits, and personal choices. Find out what your household’s “carbon footprint” is compared to the US average, and what simple practices can improve your score:

https://www3.epa.gov/carbon-footprint-calculator/

How do I read an EnergyGuide Label?

When you’re shopping for a new appliance, look for the EnergyGuide label, the yellow tag you’ll find attached to most appliances. It tells how much energy an appliance uses and makes it easier to compare the energy use of similar models. The more energy efficient an appliance is, the less it costs to run, and the lower your utility bills may potentially be.

 

Appliances with labels: boilers, central air conditioners, clothes washers, dishwashers, freezers, furnaces, heat pumps, pool heaters, refrigerators, televisions, water heaters and window air conditioners.

Appliances without labels: clothes dryers, dehumidifiers, humidifiers, ovens and ranges.